Posts Tagged ‘news’

Although our nation is a developed one, driven by the revolution of technology and communication, the force that social media extends upon many industries is one that is often overlooked. The many ways that it impacts social elements in everyday contexts are one thing, but the ability it has given the unemployed is another. With many people still struggling to find work, moving the search to this online format has opened up a range of opportunities to job seekers that was never available before.

Traditional job boards such as Career One and SEEK have long upheld the employment search on the internet, but with the integration of social media into the business world, these websites are beginning to give way to a new kind of interactive tool for the unemployed. Those who are comfortable enough to use social media to find potential vacancies within their skillsets and job fields are finding work easier than they ever had previously. Additionally, businesses are able to minimise the efforts and costs of associated with traditional employment procedures by headhunting in circles of networks within their own social media professional networks.

Australia currently sits at one of the lowest rates of unemployment in the world, but the challenge for those without jobs is still a more prominent issue. Being able to spot work where it is available demands attention and constant monitoring of print medias, but the rise of the social media-business relationship means followers of certain companies can be contacted as soon as perspective job opportunities become available. Social media websites like LinkedIn are dominating the traditional resume and CV by enabling users to display their skills, experience and connections in a public space, whilst allowing those who view their profile to endorse them for their work efforts—what better way to advertise your abilities than to show them off in a global context?

Businesses are flocking to online sources to fill openings within their companies by using social media forums liked the aforementioned LinkedIn, the infamous Facebook and even Twitter to personally headhunt the perfect individual to become a part of their team. No longer do they have to go through the tedious task of interviewing without knowing what they’re truly going to get.

Not all Australians feel satisfied yet with replacing the face-to-face communication of traditional job seeking with social media, but its bound to become a major player in the way businesses go about driving their futures.

On July 11, a 13 year old girl called Molly Lord was killed in a quad bike accident in Kembla Grange. But it was not this freak accident that caused the media storm to follow; in one of the most proactive and controversial campaigns against media intrusion, the Molly’s Law movement has triggered a public outcry in the bid to protect grieving and distressed families against death knocks.

Young Molly Lord was an accomplished equestrienne, tragically killed in a farm accident on July 11, 2012

The Illawarra Mercury, and Channel 7 are the guilty parties that initiated this movement. In the most devastating and emotional time a parent could face, freshly grieving the death of their beloved child, their situation was escalated and privacy violated by media agencies in the defence of ‘public interest’.

Goldspink-Lord was filmed by a channel 7 helicopter besides her dead daughter, and in a separate incident when consoling herself by visiting her daughters horse, had a reporter enter her house, trespassing and snooping for the Illawarra Mercury.

‘I went outside at some point to go to her horse for some comfort when the channel 7 helicopter flew above me … footage of myself sitting with my deceased daughter was put on the channel 7 website for the world to see before I had even told all my family.’
— Channel Seven, News, Facebook page, 21st July, 2012

Goldspink-Lord’s comment on Channel 7’s wall received great support, however was removed by the television station when they removed the offending video.

Lords father was overseas at the time, and was contacted for comment by these agencies. The family implored the press not to publicise the death, declined comment in a bid to have the opportunity to contact those close family and friends who had not known about the accident, but this right was denied when in minutes footage was aired on Channel 7 showing the grieving mother with her child, and a front cover on the Illawarra Mercury describing with text and image the death.

An outraged Goldspink-Lord retaliated, posting with her full name on both agencies articles her plight of intrusion, supported by thousands of comments outraged over the families treatment. A Facebook page, now supported by over 7000 fans, further publicised her plight.

‘I am the mother of the beautiful Molly Lord who was killed on a quad bike last week. I would just like to let everyone know of the pain and harassment we suffered as a result of channel 7…’ Channel Seven News, Facebook page, 21st July, 2012

The Facebook page established to support Molly’s Law, and the efforts of the Lord family in their plight.

Beyond just press coverage, bloggers including Woolly Days, WA TODAY, Crikey, FOI PRIVACY, Mumbrella and many others, have also commented and discussed this incident on many occasions, seeking an interactive medium to give consumer power back to those from media entities.

The power of social media has been clarified, with the medium providing an opportunity for the family to seek the answers they want, and are moving with legal representation to not only seek justice, but demand fairness in grieving for the protection of families in similar circumstances.

Mollys Law from Elia Lom on Vimeo.

Molly’s Law

-Elia Lom

 

Costco sign at the Docklands store

THIS week construction work has commenced on the site of the new $65 million Ringwood Costco project.

After years of negotiations, the American retail giant announced in July this year that it would open its second Melbourne store.

An aisle of Costco Docklands

Mayor Cr Rob Steane supports the development as he believes it will bring more business to the area.

He also said that the construction phase will generate 160 jobs and upon opening, the store will employ another 400 people.

“Since the announcement of Costco, QIC (the owners of Eastland) have had a significant increase in inquiries from potential businesses wanting to set up in Eastland.   So it is apparent that other businesses can see the potential in Ringwood that Costco is attracting,” Cr Steane said.

“Customers travel specially to Costco.  That will draw customers to Ringwood from Frankston, Cranbourne, Eltham and elsewhere.   These are people who would typically never come to Ringwood to shop.”

Cr Steane does not believe that increased traffic will have a negative impact on the area and that there won’t be any loss of business for surrounding businesses.

“In relation to traffic, Costco again has another unique advantage – its proximity to Eastlink. Increased traffic is well able to be handled by that facility.   Additionally Costco will have nearly 1000 parking spaces on site,” Cr Steane said.

“In relation to other businesses, whilst some local residents will move from some smaller businesses to Costco, the increased customer traffic will spill over to other businesses. The people who come to Costco, will also sit down and have a coffee, have some lunch, shop at other shops.”

Costco will be competing with nearby supermarkets Woolworths and Coles in Eastland shopping centre but local resident Kate Varnam does not believe Costco will steal their customers.

“You need a membership for Costco so I don’t think smaller shops would lose business… I wouldn’t buy vegetables or meat from Costco,” said Ms Varnam.

Janet Debeleak is an employee at Costco Docklands and believes a new Costco will be good for the economy.

“People come in from everywhere so sometimes it helps to have a Costco on the other side. It’s good for the Government, other businesses, people looking for jobs, for everyone.”

Costco Docklands employee Janet with Darcie

The Ringwood Costco is being built on the corner of Market St and Bond St and is expected to open by the end of August 2013.

Construction work on the corner of Market St and Bond St

Construction work

For more information, read these stories:

Maroondah Leader ‘Work starts at Ringwood Costco site’

Maroondah Leader ‘Costco to open in Ringwood’

By Darcie Quinn

Every year 65,000 Australians attempt to commit suicide; 2,500 are successful. Worldwide one million people take their own lives annually; that is more lives lost to suicide than to war and homicide combined. It is statistics such as these that signal the global need for change when approaching the issue of suicide.

September’s World Suicide Prevention Day and R U OK? Day promote such a change by encouraging people to openly speak about the taboo subject. Each day aims to not only raise awareness and funds to prevent suicide, but to also let those affected by or considering suicide know they are not alone.

Lifeline’s Out of the Shadows hosted a walk at St Kilda’s Catani Gardens on September 9, 2012 to mark World Suicide Prevention Day and promote these vital ideas. The core message for the day was fitting; ‘It’s okay to talk about suicide’.

“I think the slogan that we’ve got this year; ‘It’s okay to talk about suicide’, is very important,” Louise Flynn, Support After Suicide’s Manager, said. “There are unsafe ways to talk about suicide, but there are also safe and responsible ways and we need to talk about it.”

This message comes not long after the public breakdown of 46-year-old celebrity Charlotte Dawson. Dawson was repeatedly verbally abused and told to kill herself by internet trolls via the social network site Twitter. In the end, that is exactly what she attempted to do.

Sadly Dawson is merely a drop in the ocean when it comes to cyber-bullying with Microsoft’s 2008 research finding that one in four children reported to having been bullied online.

The development of technology and the growing popularity of social media have provided tormentors with additional outlets of abuse where, apparently, there are little to no consequences. What many cyber-bullies do not realise, however, is the severity of their actions.

In recent years suicide has climbed to the highest cause of death amongst men under the age of 44 and women under the age of 34. Bulling is a large contributor to this statistic.

“Every one of us has the power to lift someone up or to put them down, even in small ways that we may not realise,” founder of suicide support foundation Life Is…, Tony Gee, said. “I suggest that we all be thoughtful in our ways and walk with compassion and with care.”

Those whom operate Lifeline’s suicide hotline demonstrate the importance of being compassionate and caring. Each year 700,000 calls are placed to Melbourne’s Lifeline where 320 volunteers operate the phones day in and day out. Each volunteer aims to alleviate the callers stress and help them through their crisis.

“Our goal and, I guess our reason for living is our cause; people in crisis, people who are in danger of going down this (suicidal) road,” Terry Keating, Melbourne’s Lifeline Manager, said. “Hopefully we can change that.”

If you or someone you know is showing signs of suicide, whether it be withdrawing from friends and family, giving away possessions or talking about ‘ending it’, assistance is available. Please contact Lifeline’s 24 hour helpline on 13 11 14, Kids Help Line (5-25yrs) on 1800 55 1800 or Mensline on 1300 789 978.

If you or someone you know is in need of support following a suicide, contact Support After Suicide on (03) 9421 7640 or visit www.supportaftersuicide.org.au for more information.

AS the 2012 London Paralympics come to an end, so too does the personal struggle and anxiety for 24-year-old Loretta Nolan.

The Geelong Magistrate’s decision to charge Paralympic gold medallist Daniel Bell with breaching a personal safety intervention order, burglary, stalking and entering a private place without lawful excuse is a reason to smile for the pretty Geelong local.

‘I feel so relieved that he has been punished for what he did to me, for all the fear and anxiety that he caused me’ she said. The prosecutor indicated that Bell broke into Miss Nolan’s home address entered her bedroom and left bodily fluids on her personal belongings. ‘I was just relieved that I wasn’t home at the time, the thought of what could have happened if I was there makes me sick’ she continued.

Ms Nolans former residence, where the incident occurred.

 

A fear shared by the whole of the Nolan family with brother Kieran Nolan indicating, ‘that the whole incident left the family stressed and upset’.

 

Awarded an Order of Australia for his swimming contributions in 2005, the court indicated that although Mr Bell has Asperger’s syndrome, he was fully aware that what he was doing was wrong’.

The London Paralympics mark a personal triumph for Miss Nolan, with the court detailing that if it was not for the charges Mr Bell would have competed.  They are the first games Bell has missed since joining the Paralympic swimming squad in 2000. ‘I am glad that he misses out on the games’ she detailed ‘he doesn’t deserve to swim for our country when he does these things, I was sad and fearful because of him so I’m glad that he cannot compete’.

Bell pleaded guilty to the charges against him and has been placed on an 18 month community based order with the condition he receives rehabilitation and treatment in an effort to discourage re-offending. ‘I only wish that he had received a suspended sentence rather than his community based order so there will be harsher consequences if he re-offends, just as a precaution’.

LOCAL Knox resident and RMIT graduate Jessica Barlow, is taking a stand against the rise of the airbrushing age in women’s magazines, with self-promoted campaign The Brainwash Project.

Ms Barlow, 20, began the search toward a push for a celebration of natural beauty in publications nation-wide, after enduring a tormenting high-school experience, primarily dominated by the bullying effects of body image and the resulting pressure.

RMIT student Jessica Barlow.

Now taking the fight into her own hands, Ms Barlow is keen to show Australian print agencies that respect is mandatory for young women, as a simple act of caring for the nation’s younger generations.

“It’s clear to me that many females are interested, as well as me, in this issue,” she says.

“I am not satisfied that the majority of magazines out there for women are focused primarily on sex, boys and appearance.”

Ms Barlow has spent the first half of the year blue-printing the project, including sourcing funding from the kind donations of the public, through Pozible—the online charity funding program—to introduce a magazine for body-conscious females who are after ‘real’ content.

The Brainwash Project is self-funded and it is very expensive to create a magazine.

I’ve got 40 days left on the Pozible fundraising page and could use as much help as is out there! I’m hoping to raise $10,000 so I can print a lot of copies to distribute to young people.”

 Ms Barlow began planning the campaign, after a similar project saw successful results in the U.S, after women’s advocate Julia Bluhm demanded Seventeen Magazine to publish a non-altered image of the female body.

Jessica Barlow’s call for submissions campaign for ‘The Brainwash Project’.

Taking the lead here in Australia, Ms Barlow has claimed the attention of popular comedian Kitty Flanagan, who has appointed The Brainwash Project an official segment on Channel Ten’s news-panel program The Project.

The campaign has also attracted interest from international media through online petition site Change, and has now reached its minimum funding goal of $4,000 on Tuesday 21 August. Ms Barlow is now looking to expand the project’s funding, using its overwhelming popularity to its full extent.

“I’ve got 40 days left on the Pozible fundraising page and could use as much help as is out there!

“I’m hoping to raise $10,000 so I can print a lot of copies to distribute to young people.”

 The Brainwash Project has recently celebrated its success with a stand against women’s magazine Cleo, by having hundreds of Facebook users nation-wide, posting images of natural beauty and the effects of being body-conscious individuals in Australia. The campaign has since been granted a face-to-face meeting with Cleo Editor Gemma Crisp, to negotiate the publication’s alternatives to airbrushing and image-enhancement.

Ms Barlow and The Brainwash Project are currently calling for submissions for its first upcoming issue, after the fundraiser has concluded. To submit, visit The Brainwash Project’s homepage.

To donate, visit the campaign’s Pozible page.

Who Said Press Needed to Be Free?

Posted: September 28, 2012 by carlosbruinsma in Social Issues
Tags: , , , , , ,

By Carlos Bruinsma

As a blogger, I have written countless posts on various online media; breaking news, issues in mainstream news, and reviews of numerous products. One of the questions that haunt me as an aspiring online journalist is how important social media really is, and more importantly, how to generate an income from an ever changing profession in the free online world.Image

The last four years have showed us a massive increase in social media activity. Going by the best publicly available information gathered from various websites such as Facebook and Twitter, we see an incredible growth with Facebook taking things to unprecedented heights.

If you have been paying attention to Facebook stocks, however, you will have noticed that Facebook shares have plummeted since going on the market earlier this year. With Google AdSense still less than ideal (we’re journalists, not underpaid billboards), the future of social media journalism is becoming ever more uncertain due to lack of funds and incomes for independent journalists like

Imageourselves, without affiliation to mainstream websites or newspapers.

Or is it?

It appears there might be hope over the horizon, with affiliate marketing taking a turn for the better. With the affiliate channel projected to reach $4 billion in 2014, it would appear, as publishers, we might be able to share in this wealth without selling our souls to the devil (ahem, Google) or clogging our pages with ugly ads. After all, my blog is to inform and entertain my readers, not to annoy them to death with adverts and pop-ups.

The solution could be simple with the rise of new platforms, such as Linksert. With teams from all over the world working together to create an accessible platform specifically designed for publishers, their WordPress plugin automatically converts all of the links on your blog to links that generate a commission every time someone makes a purchase through your blog.

“Just imagine you’re browsing the web and come across a cool product you want to review or recommend to your friends, fans or reader base,” CEO and co-founder Zachar Tolmachev suggests. “If you’re going to be sharing someone else’s product, it is only fair you generate a commission for your recommendation.”

While it’s not ideal if you never review or recommend any products, it’s a good start. Imagine a world where every time you mention a product and provide the source, you get a little money off every purchase. We’re not quite there yet, but Linksert is definitely a step in the right direction.

Linksert is not available to the public yet, but I have managed to get access to the beta, courtesy of the Linksert team. Watch the video below to see how you could potentially make your hobby your profession.


Written by Katy Andrews

Since mid 2000 the City of Yarra has seen an accelerated gentrification of the area, with new retail outlets, boutique services and new restaurants leading to rising costs in rental.

In 2012 the City of Yarra reported an average increase of 3.8% in value of Yarra homes.

The City of Yarra is identified by its strong arts community but the rising costs are pushing artists out of the area.

A recent media release from the City of Yarra states that a charitable fund is to be established to help meet the costs of providing creative spaces for artists in the area.

The City of Yarra publishes an extensive guide to art galleries and spaces in Yarra.

The list of the galleries in Fitzroy, Collingwood, Abbotsford and North Fitzroy and North Carlton are available on its website with a map to download.