Posts Tagged ‘mojo’

The job industry has become more competitive in current years now that applicants can go job hunting from the comfort of their own home with websites such as Linked IN and Seek.

With vast quantities of people online and marketing themselves to prospective organizations, it has become a requirement to be digital savvy to stand out above the pack.

For older generations who are accustomed to seeking work the traditional way, this has the potential to leave them out of their element and overlooked by employers.

“I believe it’s my age, I’m in that age bracket, in my 50’s, where a lot of companies are not interested in taking on somebody in that age bracket,” said Denise Docker, who has been out of work for two years now since the Government made her last job redundant.

Age has been shown to be a handicap in certain fields due to an assumed  lack of technical competency, the business image or physical requirements.

Older people, who have been out of work for a while, are now finding prospective employers are expecting basic skill sets involving digital technologies.

“If I was employing for a role that needed knowledge in certain technologies, then if an older candidate had the same aptitude with those technologies as the younger candidate, they certainly wouldn’t be discriminated against,” said Ray Pascoe, a small company owner.

For people such as Denise, who was let go from her last job due to Government budget cuts, it is fitting that the Government assume responsibility for providing her with training to make her more employable in the current job market.

Denise said that she was contacted by Seek to study for a certificate four in business free of charge, as they received Government sponsorship for people who were struggling to find work.

This is yet another example of the benefits which some people may be unknowingly forgoing as they have yet to step foot into the cyber world.

Online job hunting does pose its flaws as well as its advantages however.

Whilst it makes it easier for people to network and get in touch with the right people, it also floods the job market and dilutes the talent pool when employers are forced to sift through dozens, or sometimes hundreds of online job applications.

Like with most elements of day to day life that have integrated themselves online, society will need to find its balance with the new and the traditional to find synergy.

 

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the unemployment rate in Australia rose to six per cent in February this year, for the first time in more than a decade. This jobless rate tops the figure reached during the height of the global financial crisis, when unemployment peaked at 5.9 per cent in June 2009.

Jomana Najeb is a Master of Creative Media graduate with a vast range of work experiences. “I’ve worked mainly in admin type roles, I’ve done a lot of project management, marketing, community events, I’ve also worked in sales…I’ve done a lot of various things, I’ve even worked in Communications as well.” Unfortunately with Victoria experiencing one of the highest jobless rates in the nation, finding work has been a challenge for Jomana and many others in a similar situation as her. Many people are becoming increasingly concerned about the lack of opportunities despite their qualifications and skills.

For some it means venturing into alternative avenues to ensure they remain employed. Brendan Pearson is from recruitment agency, OzRecruits. He says the rise in unemployment rate has impacted their work. “There’s been a marked increase in the number of applications we’re seeing as unemployment grows, we’re noticing that a lot more people are finding out about our services.” Mr Pearson says some people are deviating towards other career paths they feel provide more stability. Additionally, Mr Pearson indicates a noticeable rise in interest for courses undertaken to develop skills necessary for some roles. With the shortage of full-time positions, OzRecruits has observed a trend towards job searchers applying for part-time, casual and even temporary roles.

Meanwhile, health experts are concerned about the health effects of lengthy periods spent in front of computer screens searching and applying for jobs. Psychologist and health advocate, Santilla Charlton says people should have a routine for their day while job searching and incorporate physical activity. “We encourage people to take some breaks as you would if you were in an office. Stretch your legs, go outside and get some fresh air. Make sure you eat healthily, don’t sit eating at the computer desk. Make sure you go somewhere, maybe outside in the backyard and have your lunch there.”

For Jomana, among many tasks on her daily to-do list, she has ensured exercise takes a high priority. To clear her mind from the stress of applications, she goes for a walk each day and has joined her local gym. Furthermore, as the uncertainty of the job market continues, Jomana says she’s prepared for other options. “I spend a part of my time researching all these other opportunities for how I could work for myself because I’ve decided that the job market is getting smaller and I’d like to consider working for myself.”

 

Geelong is a city going through a turbulent transition, stranded between its history and its future. Its modern legacy as a stronghold of heavy industry – led by Ford, Alcoa and Shell – is fading fast.

Ford has been closing its Geelong manufacturing works for some time, with the final jobs to go by 2016. Alcoa has announced that its ageing aluminium smelter and rolling mill would close in August, at a cost of 800 jobs. Last year Qantas axed just under 300 maintenance jobs at the nearby Avalon Airport and Target sacked 260 workers from its Geelong head office.

Geelong has a long history as a city, and with that, a long history of being able to rebuild itself from problems past. There is little doubt Geelong will reinvent itself as a smart city of the future on the back of its tourism, agriculture and, service industries, as well as its role as a port, and  its role as a hub for new industry, such as carbon fibre manufacturing.

The inevitable and immediate pain of future uncertainty looms for Geelong’s recently unemployed. One of the major problems with widespread job cuts to similar industries to an area in a short period of time is that it creates a situation where there are too many workers looking for what little work is still available. As Professor Louse Johnson explained during my interview with her, about one third of workers will find work in a similar industry, maintaining a similar standard of living; another third will find work in lesser jobs, reducing their standard of living. For the other third, it’s unlikely that they will work again. The question of whether to remain in Geelong, the bedrock of many workers’ lives, beckons also.

Fitter and turner Jay Craven, 24, was made redundant by Ford in Geelong in an early wave of job cuts. The atmosphere of redundancy is not a good one. The media seem to know information before the workers do, and there’s a general sense of despondency in the air as colleagues and friends turn on each other in a battle for job survival.

Whilst many of his colleagues tried to find work in and around Geelong to varying degrees of success, Jay decided to apply for a jobs in Melbourne. After a period of applying for jobs without luck, a family friend suggested he apply for a maintenance job at Yarra Trams. When he found out that he got the job, the decision to head down the highway was an easy one. Unlike some of his colleagues whom were rentrenched in Geelong with homes and young families, Jay’s only attachment was a sentimental one, having lived in the area his whole life.

Jay now lives in Preston with his sister, who also works in Melbourne. He is really enjoying the change, believing his fresh start will allow him to better develop a career and grow as a person. No one likes seeing people lose their jobs, but for Jay, redundancy was was the catalyst for a positive change in his life.

Young manufacturing boss by Candy Huang

Posted: June 1, 2014 by ivoburum in Economics, mojo, Rural Events
Tags: ,

This young manufacturing boss was a student two years ago, he has had some special experience that others cannot imagine. He realized his dream, created his own brand “AUMORE WOOL”, and became a factory owner in Australia. His name is Clark, and now he is the founder and managing director of Chuanxin international Pty Ltd.

When we made an appointment for an interview, I waited outside his factory for him and notice the large sign, “AUMORE WOOL”. The neighboring factory worker Chris told me Clark was a really excellent young man, worked very hard, and that everyone who worked in this street knows him. I began to image what sort of a person he is.

During the interview, Clark told me a long story about his personal life, and how hard he worked in order to start this business. I found that this young man was very passionate for his own business, he showed me his factory and the products and told me the story about the machine. Although he had lot of pressure and stress on business, this young man was still calm and had a serious plan. I supposed that was the real difference between him and all the rest.

David, who is a boss form Mobile Essential says, “in today’s market competition, product quality is most important.

Clark said that, he flew to different places hand-picked wool in every season, and chose the best wool in the world used to make a quilt. Every time a product was sold to a different country, he hung the national flag of that country in the factory. “I want to hang the national flag of different countries in whole of industry,” Clark says proudly.

Now, his career going very stable, and he has more long-term goals. That is, to make his brand “AUMORE WOOL” a world leading luxury brand.

From a student to a young manufacturing boss is not the end of Clark’s story, it is just beginning, he has a long way to go to realize his dream.

More and more person chose to adopt animal when they want to have a pet. In my hometown, Taiwan, government and celebrities are beginning to support this issue in recent years.

When I came to Australia in 2013, I found lots of pet owners in Australia especially in Melbourne chose adoption than buying. This is because most of them think pet shops or puppy farms are making profit through animal. For the people who love animal it is so unethical.

Through I chatted with my friend, Emily, she talked to me some cruel situations of pet shops happened, like inbreeding program. And she also talked to me something about RSPCA because she adopted two dogs last year.

RSPCA Australia (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) is an Australian government funding organization. In Australia, each state has an RSPCA organization. RSPCA Victoria was established in 1871, it located in Burwood Highway, near Deakin University.

I do an interview to test about the awareness of adoption in RSPCA.I interviewed people who walked around RSPCA to ask them some simple questions such as ‘Do you know how to adopt an animal in RSPCA?’ But most of interviewees think to adopt a pet in RSPCA is a hard task.

Thus, I came to RSPCA and ask them how to adopt an animal in RSPCA? The answer was surprised me! The staff told me they knew choosing the pet for people are takes time. So, to make this process easier, RSPCA has introduced a national website called ‘Adopt A Pet’ that will let you view some of the animals waiting to be adopted at RSPCA locations across Australia.

Besides, if you prefer come to RSPCA directly, they are also welcome. You just do three steps: find a pet, fill the form and wait thee phone call.

The reason why you can take the pet directly, this is because they have to do some survey on your family background. The staff told me they want to make sure every pet find a right home. It is very important for these stray pets. They do not want to they ever come back again. They want to they stay and be happy and live for their rest lives in their new homes.

In the future, if you or your friends want to buy a pet, think about adopting in RSPCA. They are as same animals as you see in pet shops. Please, support adoption, because love does not come with a price tag.

Unemployment has always been a global issue, and there are many reasons why people lose their job, such as redundancy, company failure, or when they are injured. There are not enough jobs available for people, especially the young generation.

In recent years, more and more Chinese people choose to go abroad to study in order to have a better future. However, with fierce competition and differences in culture backgrounds, it is not easy to find a decent job in foreign countries.

Some students choose to open their own business. Is it the best way for international students?Actually, this solution has pros and cons.

If you think it is a fun and exciting career, you are only partially correct. There are also many unpredictable risks for the entrepreneur. However, not everyone wants to take risks, nor have abilities to tackle crisis.

In contrast, international students who are passionate and creative, as well as having the capacity for risk-taking and forecasting future possibilities are equipped to set up their own business. They can address the issue of unemployment. Moreover, they also can enhance their individual value, and make their life better and happier via their efforts.

In my story, I interviewed a dancer who is named Yiaoqian Guo. She was out of work because she injured her waist, and could not stand on the stage to dance as a professional folk dancer. However, she did not give up, and chose to come to Melbourne to study and to update her skills. Now she has opened her own dance training centre in Melbourne.

I hope that her story will encourage international students who are facing difficulty in their careers to improve their outlook. I also want to inspire them to never give up on their dreams. If you have passion and believe you can do well, just make an effort and try to do it. Even if we face difficulties in our lives, we should build confidence for the future.

Finally, I want to say some additional words. Individuals have different psychological frustration tolerance when they face difficulties. Some people can quickly overcome negative feelings and turn over a new leaf. However, others may experience a low mood for a long time. If you are the latter, you would be better to find positive ways to adjust your situation. Whatever the reasons, we should believe that everyday will be a brilliant new start.

Melbourne leads the way for creating sporting opportunities for young girls.

Most girls around the world would dream of having the opportunity to play and use the same facilities as their favourite sporting heroes such as Raphael Nadal and Maria Sharapova.

Here in Melbourne, girls have access to exactly that. They can rub shoulders with Casey Dellacqua and Jelena Dokic while training at the National Tennis Centre. They can use the star’s facilities to get changed, play on the same courts and have access to international coaches for their tennis lessons.

Eleven year old Jennifer Madgwick is part of the National Tennis Centre’s Development Squad and trains there after school. “I really enjoy tennis, it’s a very social sport and I can train here after school as it’s only a short drive away for my mum”, she said.

AFL is also a huge part of Melbourne’s sporting culture and it’s not unusual for kids to be overly passionate about supporting their favourite team. Some kids start playing AusKick at five years old. Although AFL is traditionally played by men, the local footy clubs usually try and cater for the girls who have a passion for the sport. “I can kick a footy as well as the boys at school. My teacher asked me to join the school AFL team and he put me straight into the full forward position because of my kick. The boys didn’t mind, as I scored a few goals,” Jennifer said.

Chris Pearce, who has been involved in the local community for many years, has enjoyed working at local sporting clubs. “Australia’s known throughout the world for its sporting excellence. I think in Australia, girls have the same opportunities as boys to participate actively in sports, all the way through to the highest level, where all our most wonderful champions have represented Australia”, he said.

Melbourne offers girls a huge range of representative and local sporting opportunities, in basketball, netball, athletics and AFL, that cater for girls at all levels. “Most clubs have teams at every level, and as you learn the game and the rules, you can progress into the development squad if you really like the sport”, Jennifer said.

Although our nation is a developed one, driven by the revolution of technology and communication, the force that social media extends upon many industries is one that is often overlooked. The many ways that it impacts social elements in everyday contexts are one thing, but the ability it has given the unemployed is another. With many people still struggling to find work, moving the search to this online format has opened up a range of opportunities to job seekers that was never available before.

Traditional job boards such as Career One and SEEK have long upheld the employment search on the internet, but with the integration of social media into the business world, these websites are beginning to give way to a new kind of interactive tool for the unemployed. Those who are comfortable enough to use social media to find potential vacancies within their skillsets and job fields are finding work easier than they ever had previously. Additionally, businesses are able to minimise the efforts and costs of associated with traditional employment procedures by headhunting in circles of networks within their own social media professional networks.

Australia currently sits at one of the lowest rates of unemployment in the world, but the challenge for those without jobs is still a more prominent issue. Being able to spot work where it is available demands attention and constant monitoring of print medias, but the rise of the social media-business relationship means followers of certain companies can be contacted as soon as perspective job opportunities become available. Social media websites like LinkedIn are dominating the traditional resume and CV by enabling users to display their skills, experience and connections in a public space, whilst allowing those who view their profile to endorse them for their work efforts—what better way to advertise your abilities than to show them off in a global context?

Businesses are flocking to online sources to fill openings within their companies by using social media forums liked the aforementioned LinkedIn, the infamous Facebook and even Twitter to personally headhunt the perfect individual to become a part of their team. No longer do they have to go through the tedious task of interviewing without knowing what they’re truly going to get.

Not all Australians feel satisfied yet with replacing the face-to-face communication of traditional job seeking with social media, but its bound to become a major player in the way businesses go about driving their futures.