Posts Tagged ‘employment’

 

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the unemployment rate in Australia rose to six per cent in February this year, for the first time in more than a decade. This jobless rate tops the figure reached during the height of the global financial crisis, when unemployment peaked at 5.9 per cent in June 2009.

Jomana Najeb is a Master of Creative Media graduate with a vast range of work experiences. “I’ve worked mainly in admin type roles, I’ve done a lot of project management, marketing, community events, I’ve also worked in sales…I’ve done a lot of various things, I’ve even worked in Communications as well.” Unfortunately with Victoria experiencing one of the highest jobless rates in the nation, finding work has been a challenge for Jomana and many others in a similar situation as her. Many people are becoming increasingly concerned about the lack of opportunities despite their qualifications and skills.

For some it means venturing into alternative avenues to ensure they remain employed. Brendan Pearson is from recruitment agency, OzRecruits. He says the rise in unemployment rate has impacted their work. “There’s been a marked increase in the number of applications we’re seeing as unemployment grows, we’re noticing that a lot more people are finding out about our services.” Mr Pearson says some people are deviating towards other career paths they feel provide more stability. Additionally, Mr Pearson indicates a noticeable rise in interest for courses undertaken to develop skills necessary for some roles. With the shortage of full-time positions, OzRecruits has observed a trend towards job searchers applying for part-time, casual and even temporary roles.

Meanwhile, health experts are concerned about the health effects of lengthy periods spent in front of computer screens searching and applying for jobs. Psychologist and health advocate, Santilla Charlton says people should have a routine for their day while job searching and incorporate physical activity. “We encourage people to take some breaks as you would if you were in an office. Stretch your legs, go outside and get some fresh air. Make sure you eat healthily, don’t sit eating at the computer desk. Make sure you go somewhere, maybe outside in the backyard and have your lunch there.”

For Jomana, among many tasks on her daily to-do list, she has ensured exercise takes a high priority. To clear her mind from the stress of applications, she goes for a walk each day and has joined her local gym. Furthermore, as the uncertainty of the job market continues, Jomana says she’s prepared for other options. “I spend a part of my time researching all these other opportunities for how I could work for myself because I’ve decided that the job market is getting smaller and I’d like to consider working for myself.”

 

Geelong is a city going through a turbulent transition, stranded between its history and its future. Its modern legacy as a stronghold of heavy industry – led by Ford, Alcoa and Shell – is fading fast.

Ford has been closing its Geelong manufacturing works for some time, with the final jobs to go by 2016. Alcoa has announced that its ageing aluminium smelter and rolling mill would close in August, at a cost of 800 jobs. Last year Qantas axed just under 300 maintenance jobs at the nearby Avalon Airport and Target sacked 260 workers from its Geelong head office.

Geelong has a long history as a city, and with that, a long history of being able to rebuild itself from problems past. There is little doubt Geelong will reinvent itself as a smart city of the future on the back of its tourism, agriculture and, service industries, as well as its role as a port, and  its role as a hub for new industry, such as carbon fibre manufacturing.

The inevitable and immediate pain of future uncertainty looms for Geelong’s recently unemployed. One of the major problems with widespread job cuts to similar industries to an area in a short period of time is that it creates a situation where there are too many workers looking for what little work is still available. As Professor Louse Johnson explained during my interview with her, about one third of workers will find work in a similar industry, maintaining a similar standard of living; another third will find work in lesser jobs, reducing their standard of living. For the other third, it’s unlikely that they will work again. The question of whether to remain in Geelong, the bedrock of many workers’ lives, beckons also.

Fitter and turner Jay Craven, 24, was made redundant by Ford in Geelong in an early wave of job cuts. The atmosphere of redundancy is not a good one. The media seem to know information before the workers do, and there’s a general sense of despondency in the air as colleagues and friends turn on each other in a battle for job survival.

Whilst many of his colleagues tried to find work in and around Geelong to varying degrees of success, Jay decided to apply for a jobs in Melbourne. After a period of applying for jobs without luck, a family friend suggested he apply for a maintenance job at Yarra Trams. When he found out that he got the job, the decision to head down the highway was an easy one. Unlike some of his colleagues whom were rentrenched in Geelong with homes and young families, Jay’s only attachment was a sentimental one, having lived in the area his whole life.

Jay now lives in Preston with his sister, who also works in Melbourne. He is really enjoying the change, believing his fresh start will allow him to better develop a career and grow as a person. No one likes seeing people lose their jobs, but for Jay, redundancy was was the catalyst for a positive change in his life.

Students or workers by Catherine Shelley

Posted: October 17, 2011 by Ethical Martini in Deakin University, Education
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Is student life really ‘the easy life’ that older generations think? Stories based around a little Italian restaurant that show the trends in university lifestyle are changing.