Posts Tagged ‘Deakin’

 

Geelong is a city going through a turbulent transition, stranded between its history and its future. Its modern legacy as a stronghold of heavy industry – led by Ford, Alcoa and Shell – is fading fast.

Ford has been closing its Geelong manufacturing works for some time, with the final jobs to go by 2016. Alcoa has announced that its ageing aluminium smelter and rolling mill would close in August, at a cost of 800 jobs. Last year Qantas axed just under 300 maintenance jobs at the nearby Avalon Airport and Target sacked 260 workers from its Geelong head office.

Geelong has a long history as a city, and with that, a long history of being able to rebuild itself from problems past. There is little doubt Geelong will reinvent itself as a smart city of the future on the back of its tourism, agriculture and, service industries, as well as its role as a port, and  its role as a hub for new industry, such as carbon fibre manufacturing.

The inevitable and immediate pain of future uncertainty looms for Geelong’s recently unemployed. One of the major problems with widespread job cuts to similar industries to an area in a short period of time is that it creates a situation where there are too many workers looking for what little work is still available. As Professor Louse Johnson explained during my interview with her, about one third of workers will find work in a similar industry, maintaining a similar standard of living; another third will find work in lesser jobs, reducing their standard of living. For the other third, it’s unlikely that they will work again. The question of whether to remain in Geelong, the bedrock of many workers’ lives, beckons also.

Fitter and turner Jay Craven, 24, was made redundant by Ford in Geelong in an early wave of job cuts. The atmosphere of redundancy is not a good one. The media seem to know information before the workers do, and there’s a general sense of despondency in the air as colleagues and friends turn on each other in a battle for job survival.

Whilst many of his colleagues tried to find work in and around Geelong to varying degrees of success, Jay decided to apply for a jobs in Melbourne. After a period of applying for jobs without luck, a family friend suggested he apply for a maintenance job at Yarra Trams. When he found out that he got the job, the decision to head down the highway was an easy one. Unlike some of his colleagues whom were rentrenched in Geelong with homes and young families, Jay’s only attachment was a sentimental one, having lived in the area his whole life.

Jay now lives in Preston with his sister, who also works in Melbourne. He is really enjoying the change, believing his fresh start will allow him to better develop a career and grow as a person. No one likes seeing people lose their jobs, but for Jay, redundancy was was the catalyst for a positive change in his life.

Unemployment has always been a global issue, and there are many reasons why people lose their job, such as redundancy, company failure, or when they are injured. There are not enough jobs available for people, especially the young generation.

In recent years, more and more Chinese people choose to go abroad to study in order to have a better future. However, with fierce competition and differences in culture backgrounds, it is not easy to find a decent job in foreign countries.

Some students choose to open their own business. Is it the best way for international students?Actually, this solution has pros and cons.

If you think it is a fun and exciting career, you are only partially correct. There are also many unpredictable risks for the entrepreneur. However, not everyone wants to take risks, nor have abilities to tackle crisis.

In contrast, international students who are passionate and creative, as well as having the capacity for risk-taking and forecasting future possibilities are equipped to set up their own business. They can address the issue of unemployment. Moreover, they also can enhance their individual value, and make their life better and happier via their efforts.

In my story, I interviewed a dancer who is named Yiaoqian Guo. She was out of work because she injured her waist, and could not stand on the stage to dance as a professional folk dancer. However, she did not give up, and chose to come to Melbourne to study and to update her skills. Now she has opened her own dance training centre in Melbourne.

I hope that her story will encourage international students who are facing difficulty in their careers to improve their outlook. I also want to inspire them to never give up on their dreams. If you have passion and believe you can do well, just make an effort and try to do it. Even if we face difficulties in our lives, we should build confidence for the future.

Finally, I want to say some additional words. Individuals have different psychological frustration tolerance when they face difficulties. Some people can quickly overcome negative feelings and turn over a new leaf. However, others may experience a low mood for a long time. If you are the latter, you would be better to find positive ways to adjust your situation. Whatever the reasons, we should believe that everyday will be a brilliant new start.

Costco sign at the Docklands store

THIS week construction work has commenced on the site of the new $65 million Ringwood Costco project.

After years of negotiations, the American retail giant announced in July this year that it would open its second Melbourne store.

An aisle of Costco Docklands

Mayor Cr Rob Steane supports the development as he believes it will bring more business to the area.

He also said that the construction phase will generate 160 jobs and upon opening, the store will employ another 400 people.

“Since the announcement of Costco, QIC (the owners of Eastland) have had a significant increase in inquiries from potential businesses wanting to set up in Eastland.   So it is apparent that other businesses can see the potential in Ringwood that Costco is attracting,” Cr Steane said.

“Customers travel specially to Costco.  That will draw customers to Ringwood from Frankston, Cranbourne, Eltham and elsewhere.   These are people who would typically never come to Ringwood to shop.”

Cr Steane does not believe that increased traffic will have a negative impact on the area and that there won’t be any loss of business for surrounding businesses.

“In relation to traffic, Costco again has another unique advantage – its proximity to Eastlink. Increased traffic is well able to be handled by that facility.   Additionally Costco will have nearly 1000 parking spaces on site,” Cr Steane said.

“In relation to other businesses, whilst some local residents will move from some smaller businesses to Costco, the increased customer traffic will spill over to other businesses. The people who come to Costco, will also sit down and have a coffee, have some lunch, shop at other shops.”

Costco will be competing with nearby supermarkets Woolworths and Coles in Eastland shopping centre but local resident Kate Varnam does not believe Costco will steal their customers.

“You need a membership for Costco so I don’t think smaller shops would lose business… I wouldn’t buy vegetables or meat from Costco,” said Ms Varnam.

Janet Debeleak is an employee at Costco Docklands and believes a new Costco will be good for the economy.

“People come in from everywhere so sometimes it helps to have a Costco on the other side. It’s good for the Government, other businesses, people looking for jobs, for everyone.”

Costco Docklands employee Janet with Darcie

The Ringwood Costco is being built on the corner of Market St and Bond St and is expected to open by the end of August 2013.

Construction work on the corner of Market St and Bond St

Construction work

For more information, read these stories:

Maroondah Leader ‘Work starts at Ringwood Costco site’

Maroondah Leader ‘Costco to open in Ringwood’

By Darcie Quinn

AS the 2012 London Paralympics come to an end, so too does the personal struggle and anxiety for 24-year-old Loretta Nolan.

The Geelong Magistrate’s decision to charge Paralympic gold medallist Daniel Bell with breaching a personal safety intervention order, burglary, stalking and entering a private place without lawful excuse is a reason to smile for the pretty Geelong local.

‘I feel so relieved that he has been punished for what he did to me, for all the fear and anxiety that he caused me’ she said. The prosecutor indicated that Bell broke into Miss Nolan’s home address entered her bedroom and left bodily fluids on her personal belongings. ‘I was just relieved that I wasn’t home at the time, the thought of what could have happened if I was there makes me sick’ she continued.

Ms Nolans former residence, where the incident occurred.

 

A fear shared by the whole of the Nolan family with brother Kieran Nolan indicating, ‘that the whole incident left the family stressed and upset’.

 

Awarded an Order of Australia for his swimming contributions in 2005, the court indicated that although Mr Bell has Asperger’s syndrome, he was fully aware that what he was doing was wrong’.

The London Paralympics mark a personal triumph for Miss Nolan, with the court detailing that if it was not for the charges Mr Bell would have competed.  They are the first games Bell has missed since joining the Paralympic swimming squad in 2000. ‘I am glad that he misses out on the games’ she detailed ‘he doesn’t deserve to swim for our country when he does these things, I was sad and fearful because of him so I’m glad that he cannot compete’.

Bell pleaded guilty to the charges against him and has been placed on an 18 month community based order with the condition he receives rehabilitation and treatment in an effort to discourage re-offending. ‘I only wish that he had received a suspended sentence rather than his community based order so there will be harsher consequences if he re-offends, just as a precaution’.

LOCAL Knox resident and RMIT graduate Jessica Barlow, is taking a stand against the rise of the airbrushing age in women’s magazines, with self-promoted campaign The Brainwash Project.

Ms Barlow, 20, began the search toward a push for a celebration of natural beauty in publications nation-wide, after enduring a tormenting high-school experience, primarily dominated by the bullying effects of body image and the resulting pressure.

RMIT student Jessica Barlow.

Now taking the fight into her own hands, Ms Barlow is keen to show Australian print agencies that respect is mandatory for young women, as a simple act of caring for the nation’s younger generations.

“It’s clear to me that many females are interested, as well as me, in this issue,” she says.

“I am not satisfied that the majority of magazines out there for women are focused primarily on sex, boys and appearance.”

Ms Barlow has spent the first half of the year blue-printing the project, including sourcing funding from the kind donations of the public, through Pozible—the online charity funding program—to introduce a magazine for body-conscious females who are after ‘real’ content.

The Brainwash Project is self-funded and it is very expensive to create a magazine.

I’ve got 40 days left on the Pozible fundraising page and could use as much help as is out there! I’m hoping to raise $10,000 so I can print a lot of copies to distribute to young people.”

 Ms Barlow began planning the campaign, after a similar project saw successful results in the U.S, after women’s advocate Julia Bluhm demanded Seventeen Magazine to publish a non-altered image of the female body.

Jessica Barlow’s call for submissions campaign for ‘The Brainwash Project’.

Taking the lead here in Australia, Ms Barlow has claimed the attention of popular comedian Kitty Flanagan, who has appointed The Brainwash Project an official segment on Channel Ten’s news-panel program The Project.

The campaign has also attracted interest from international media through online petition site Change, and has now reached its minimum funding goal of $4,000 on Tuesday 21 August. Ms Barlow is now looking to expand the project’s funding, using its overwhelming popularity to its full extent.

“I’ve got 40 days left on the Pozible fundraising page and could use as much help as is out there!

“I’m hoping to raise $10,000 so I can print a lot of copies to distribute to young people.”

 The Brainwash Project has recently celebrated its success with a stand against women’s magazine Cleo, by having hundreds of Facebook users nation-wide, posting images of natural beauty and the effects of being body-conscious individuals in Australia. The campaign has since been granted a face-to-face meeting with Cleo Editor Gemma Crisp, to negotiate the publication’s alternatives to airbrushing and image-enhancement.

Ms Barlow and The Brainwash Project are currently calling for submissions for its first upcoming issue, after the fundraiser has concluded. To submit, visit The Brainwash Project’s homepage.

To donate, visit the campaign’s Pozible page.

The fashion industry is a highly competitive one, and trying to get a job can be a tricky thing to get. These days, especially with how poorly the economy has been, retail sales have plummeted making it even more difficult for the recently graduated to make a career in fashion. A survey by Graduate Stats Australia highlighted the stats of December 2011 and displayed that, “76.6 per cent were in full time employment within 4 months of completing the degree”  (Grad Stats Australia, 2011). Although the statistics seem somewhat promising, many students seeking a career in a fashion are urged to do as much volunteer work and internships as possible.

After attending the Fashion Media seminar held by Prospect 360 earlier this year, many successful spokeswomen currently in the fashion industry gave a few tips of the trade and insight into the pathways to success.   Melissa Templeton, current PR manager for Myer Australia stated, “Get out and meet people. In our industry, we do literally meet hundreds of people a year, but do your best to remember people’s names”. This goes back to the golden saying that, ‘it’s not what you know but who you know’. Templeton explained that she had no tertiary experience nor any in PR, and that she worked her way up by starting a temp job at David Jones and working her way up from there. This could lead to the belief that higher education can be questionable when wanting to pursue a career in fashion or even media.

Greta Donaldson, founder of Prospect 360, a series of seminars to help young people get their foot in the door in the media industry set up in 2007 agrees with the “it’s not what you know but who you know” statement, but also believes education still holds value and importance in the media industry.

It appears as though some students are taking things a step further with their education in fashion. A student from the Whitehouse Institute of Design says, “Studying fashion design requires me to have the skills and knowledge to sketch garments properly as well as pattern making. Doing this gives me the head start over others that have not yet learnt the necessary skills”.

Casual academic teaching Communications and Creative Arts at Deakin University, Lara Hedberg is bias on the, ‘its not what you know but who you know’ statement and says, “The thing that you get from studying at a university level is an ability to have a level of credible thinking and awareness that I don’t think you can get just from industry work.”.

The general consensus on the matter seems to agree that it is who you know that will assist in getting your foot in the door, but having a degree to support your credibility is ideal.

 By Magnus Nygren Syversen 

Quick and technical Etihad KSA proved unstoppable Thursday, beating their opponents, Hammers, 6-1 in the final as the Deakin YMCA indoor soccer season came to an end.

Indoor soccer, or futsal, is a growing sport in Melbourne. Hosting one competetition for each trimester of the school year, Deakin YMCA saw enough teams sign up this trimester to form three divisions – grade A, B and C.

Last Wednesday saw the league stage of the competition come to an end with the tough and physical team Hammers clinching the top spot, beating their smaller, more agile rivals Etihad KSA on goal difference. Both teams finished on 20 points, both having won five games, lost one and drawn two.

After seeing away their semi-final opposition, with Hammers beating Sunny Boy and Etihad beating Power Rangers respetively, the two top teams faced each other in the final Thursday. What looked like a close game on paper proved to be nothing but, as speed trumped power and Etihad proved simply too much for Hammers to handle.

Over 20 supporters cheered Etihad on from the sideline, singing, chanting and waving Saudi Arabian flags. The players, a group of young Arab students spread out at several univeristies in Melbourne clearly benefitted from the support, and were quick to address the crowd with each ball that founds its way to the back of the net.

With a 3-0 lead at half-time Etihad looked comfortable going in to the second half. A quick goal by Hasan Aljubran increasing the lead to 4-0 only a minute into the half helped their confidence grow even further.

Hammers never gave up, even after letting in a fifth and sixth goal, and kept fighting to the final whistle. They managed to get a consolation goal late in the half, but from first whistle to last there was never any real doubt as to who the winners were going to be.

Etihad players celebrate with their fans after becoming Deakin YMCA Grade A Indor Soccer champions.

As the final whistle went the Arabian cheer squad stormed the pitch and celebrated with the players, throwing them up in the air. Etihad had claimed a convincing 6-1 victory, and could lift the trophy as the new Deakin YMCA Grade A Indoor Soccer Champions.

Runners-up Hammers finished first in the league, but admitted they were beaten by a better team in the final.

Hammers deserve praise for their fighting spirit, and will get a chance to their revenge on Etihad when a new competition starts in Trimester 2.

The Creative Bean by Helene Vagsvoll

Posted: November 14, 2011 by ivoburum in Deakin University, Social Issues
Tags: , ,

Being able to buy cheap coffee on campus is essential to maintaining creativity – but how do we get our daily fix at the right price?