Archive for the ‘redundancy’ Category

The job industry has become more competitive in current years now that applicants can go job hunting from the comfort of their own home with websites such as Linked IN and Seek.

With vast quantities of people online and marketing themselves to prospective organizations, it has become a requirement to be digital savvy to stand out above the pack.

For older generations who are accustomed to seeking work the traditional way, this has the potential to leave them out of their element and overlooked by employers.

“I believe it’s my age, I’m in that age bracket, in my 50’s, where a lot of companies are not interested in taking on somebody in that age bracket,” said Denise Docker, who has been out of work for two years now since the Government made her last job redundant.

Age has been shown to be a handicap in certain fields due to an assumed  lack of technical competency, the business image or physical requirements.

Older people, who have been out of work for a while, are now finding prospective employers are expecting basic skill sets involving digital technologies.

“If I was employing for a role that needed knowledge in certain technologies, then if an older candidate had the same aptitude with those technologies as the younger candidate, they certainly wouldn’t be discriminated against,” said Ray Pascoe, a small company owner.

For people such as Denise, who was let go from her last job due to Government budget cuts, it is fitting that the Government assume responsibility for providing her with training to make her more employable in the current job market.

Denise said that she was contacted by Seek to study for a certificate four in business free of charge, as they received Government sponsorship for people who were struggling to find work.

This is yet another example of the benefits which some people may be unknowingly forgoing as they have yet to step foot into the cyber world.

Online job hunting does pose its flaws as well as its advantages however.

Whilst it makes it easier for people to network and get in touch with the right people, it also floods the job market and dilutes the talent pool when employers are forced to sift through dozens, or sometimes hundreds of online job applications.

Like with most elements of day to day life that have integrated themselves online, society will need to find its balance with the new and the traditional to find synergy.

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According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the unemployment rate in Australia rose to six per cent in February this year, for the first time in more than a decade. This jobless rate tops the figure reached during the height of the global financial crisis, when unemployment peaked at 5.9 per cent in June 2009.

Jomana Najeb is a Master of Creative Media graduate with a vast range of work experiences. “I’ve worked mainly in admin type roles, I’ve done a lot of project management, marketing, community events, I’ve also worked in sales…I’ve done a lot of various things, I’ve even worked in Communications as well.” Unfortunately with Victoria experiencing one of the highest jobless rates in the nation, finding work has been a challenge for Jomana and many others in a similar situation as her. Many people are becoming increasingly concerned about the lack of opportunities despite their qualifications and skills.

For some it means venturing into alternative avenues to ensure they remain employed. Brendan Pearson is from recruitment agency, OzRecruits. He says the rise in unemployment rate has impacted their work. “There’s been a marked increase in the number of applications we’re seeing as unemployment grows, we’re noticing that a lot more people are finding out about our services.” Mr Pearson says some people are deviating towards other career paths they feel provide more stability. Additionally, Mr Pearson indicates a noticeable rise in interest for courses undertaken to develop skills necessary for some roles. With the shortage of full-time positions, OzRecruits has observed a trend towards job searchers applying for part-time, casual and even temporary roles.

Meanwhile, health experts are concerned about the health effects of lengthy periods spent in front of computer screens searching and applying for jobs. Psychologist and health advocate, Santilla Charlton says people should have a routine for their day while job searching and incorporate physical activity. “We encourage people to take some breaks as you would if you were in an office. Stretch your legs, go outside and get some fresh air. Make sure you eat healthily, don’t sit eating at the computer desk. Make sure you go somewhere, maybe outside in the backyard and have your lunch there.”

For Jomana, among many tasks on her daily to-do list, she has ensured exercise takes a high priority. To clear her mind from the stress of applications, she goes for a walk each day and has joined her local gym. Furthermore, as the uncertainty of the job market continues, Jomana says she’s prepared for other options. “I spend a part of my time researching all these other opportunities for how I could work for myself because I’ve decided that the job market is getting smaller and I’d like to consider working for myself.”