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Although our nation is a developed one, driven by the revolution of technology and communication, the force that social media extends upon many industries is one that is often overlooked. The many ways that it impacts social elements in everyday contexts are one thing, but the ability it has given the unemployed is another. With many people still struggling to find work, moving the search to this online format has opened up a range of opportunities to job seekers that was never available before.

Traditional job boards such as Career One and SEEK have long upheld the employment search on the internet, but with the integration of social media into the business world, these websites are beginning to give way to a new kind of interactive tool for the unemployed. Those who are comfortable enough to use social media to find potential vacancies within their skillsets and job fields are finding work easier than they ever had previously. Additionally, businesses are able to minimise the efforts and costs of associated with traditional employment procedures by headhunting in circles of networks within their own social media professional networks.

Australia currently sits at one of the lowest rates of unemployment in the world, but the challenge for those without jobs is still a more prominent issue. Being able to spot work where it is available demands attention and constant monitoring of print medias, but the rise of the social media-business relationship means followers of certain companies can be contacted as soon as perspective job opportunities become available. Social media websites like LinkedIn are dominating the traditional resume and CV by enabling users to display their skills, experience and connections in a public space, whilst allowing those who view their profile to endorse them for their work efforts—what better way to advertise your abilities than to show them off in a global context?

Businesses are flocking to online sources to fill openings within their companies by using social media forums liked the aforementioned LinkedIn, the infamous Facebook and even Twitter to personally headhunt the perfect individual to become a part of their team. No longer do they have to go through the tedious task of interviewing without knowing what they’re truly going to get.

Not all Australians feel satisfied yet with replacing the face-to-face communication of traditional job seeking with social media, but its bound to become a major player in the way businesses go about driving their futures.

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LOCAL Knox resident and RMIT graduate Jessica Barlow, is taking a stand against the rise of the airbrushing age in women’s magazines, with self-promoted campaign The Brainwash Project.

Ms Barlow, 20, began the search toward a push for a celebration of natural beauty in publications nation-wide, after enduring a tormenting high-school experience, primarily dominated by the bullying effects of body image and the resulting pressure.

RMIT student Jessica Barlow.

Now taking the fight into her own hands, Ms Barlow is keen to show Australian print agencies that respect is mandatory for young women, as a simple act of caring for the nation’s younger generations.

“It’s clear to me that many females are interested, as well as me, in this issue,” she says.

“I am not satisfied that the majority of magazines out there for women are focused primarily on sex, boys and appearance.”

Ms Barlow has spent the first half of the year blue-printing the project, including sourcing funding from the kind donations of the public, through Pozible—the online charity funding program—to introduce a magazine for body-conscious females who are after ‘real’ content.

The Brainwash Project is self-funded and it is very expensive to create a magazine.

I’ve got 40 days left on the Pozible fundraising page and could use as much help as is out there! I’m hoping to raise $10,000 so I can print a lot of copies to distribute to young people.”

 Ms Barlow began planning the campaign, after a similar project saw successful results in the U.S, after women’s advocate Julia Bluhm demanded Seventeen Magazine to publish a non-altered image of the female body.

Jessica Barlow’s call for submissions campaign for ‘The Brainwash Project’.

Taking the lead here in Australia, Ms Barlow has claimed the attention of popular comedian Kitty Flanagan, who has appointed The Brainwash Project an official segment on Channel Ten’s news-panel program The Project.

The campaign has also attracted interest from international media through online petition site Change, and has now reached its minimum funding goal of $4,000 on Tuesday 21 August. Ms Barlow is now looking to expand the project’s funding, using its overwhelming popularity to its full extent.

“I’ve got 40 days left on the Pozible fundraising page and could use as much help as is out there!

“I’m hoping to raise $10,000 so I can print a lot of copies to distribute to young people.”

 The Brainwash Project has recently celebrated its success with a stand against women’s magazine Cleo, by having hundreds of Facebook users nation-wide, posting images of natural beauty and the effects of being body-conscious individuals in Australia. The campaign has since been granted a face-to-face meeting with Cleo Editor Gemma Crisp, to negotiate the publication’s alternatives to airbrushing and image-enhancement.

Ms Barlow and The Brainwash Project are currently calling for submissions for its first upcoming issue, after the fundraiser has concluded. To submit, visit The Brainwash Project’s homepage.

To donate, visit the campaign’s Pozible page.